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Posts in category Carbon Utilisation

CO2Chem Seedcorn Grants 2018

CO2Chem Seedcorn grants support CO2 utilisation research and development in the UK. They are intended for pump-priming investigations, leading to further work, funding and publications.  The funding comes directly from CO2Chem. It can be spent on salaries and equipment/resources.

For 2018, we have funds available for five grants of up to £10,000 each.

Proposals need to  demonstrate a realistic pathway to further work and funding. Where possible, they should also lead directly to a research paper. The grant must be spent between May 2018 – Dec 2018 and a final report will be required by end of March 2019.

 Download eligibility criteria, application form and guidance notes

Applications should be returned to rob@co2chem.com by 5.00 pm 4th April 2018. Successful applicants will be notified in mid-April 2018

ICCDU – Travel Bursaries

ICCDU XVI (Rio de Janeiro, Brazil)
The 16th International Conference on Carbon Dioxide Utilization (ICCDU XVI) will be held in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, from the 27th to 30th August 2018.

The conference theme is ‘Sustainability through CO2 Utilization’ and encompasses six topics: Thermal and Catalytic Conversion of CO2 into Fuels and Chemicals; CO2 Conversion by  lectrochemical, Photochemical, Plasma-Induced and other non-Conventional Energy Sources; CO2 Conversion by Biotechnological Routes; CO2 Capture Processes; CO2 as Working Agent; Policies, Regulations, Life Cycle Analysis, Economic, Environmental and Social Aspects of Sustainable CO2 Utilization.

=> The abstract deadline is 4 March 2018. Submission details are here.

 

Travel Bursaries
As for previous years, CO2Chem is offering UK funded travel bursaries to support attendance.  There are five £1000 bursaries available.

Eligibility
In order to be eligible, applicants must:
– work at a UK based research institution
– have submitted an abstract (oral presentation) direct to the ICCDU
– have had it approved
– and have access to adequate matching funds*

* total cost, including registration, travel from the UK, accommodation and subsistence, is estimated to be around £2000. The CO2Chem travel bursary provides up to £1000 only.

 

To apply, please send us:
(1) Your application via this online form 
(2) A copy of your submitted abstract by email
(3) A copy of its acceptance from ICCDU by email

Send emails to rob@co2chem.com.

Please complete/send items (1) and (2) as soon as possible, and item (3) soon after the decisions are communicated (likley to be 11th April).

=>The deadline for receiving all three items is 5.00 pm 28th April.

 

Awards
The CO2Chem management group will review the applications and make awards based on a combination of quality of abstract, interest/relevance of the field , geographic balance, and balance of career stage. Successful applicants will be notified as soon as possible. This is likely to be mid-May.

 

 

BEIS invites tenders for the first phase of its £20 million CCU Demonstration programme

As part of the Government’s Clean Growth Strategy BEIS will be allocating up to £20 million to design and construct carbon capture and utilisation (CCU) demonstration projects. This programme will encourage industrial sites to capture carbon dioxide which could then be used in industrial applications. This would help to enable a pathway for learning and development of capture technologies at an intermediate scale, reducing the costs and risks. The programme will be run in three phases:

Phase 1 will be an initial scoping study for an engineering supplier to work on BEIS’ behalf with potential host sites, carbon dioxide users and technology suppliers to produce site-specific cost estimates for deploying CCU at UK industrial sites.

Phase 1 Invitation to Tender

Timeline: Questions Submission (15 Dec), Responses (22 Dec), Tender Submission (22 Jan), Award (12 Feb)

Phase 2 will fund design studies and phase 3 will fund projects to construct and demonstrate CCU.

Further Information

ICCDU 2018 Abstracts are now open

The 16th International Conference on Carbon Dioxide Utilization (ICCDU XVI) will be held in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, from the 27th to 30th August 2018. The ICCDU XVI will be organized under the seal of the Brazilian Catalysis Society (SBCat)

The main focus of the conference is “Sustainability through CO2 Utilization” and will encompasses six topics: Thermal and Catalytic Conversion of CO2 into Fuels and Chemicals; CO2 Conversion by Electrochemical, Photochemical, Plasma-Induced and other non-Conventional Energy Sources; CO2 Conversion by Biotechnological Routes; CO2 Capture Processes; CO2 as Working Agent; Policies, Regulations, Life Cycle Analysis, Economic, Environmental and Social Aspects of Sustainable CO2 Utilization.

Abstract submission is now open at http://iccdu2018.com/ . We hope to see you there.

C02 Chemistry Jobs at Imperial College

The Department of Chemistry at Imperial College is planning to make up to 10 new academic appointments from Lecturer to full Professor.

The University has indicated that one area of particular interest is the heterogeneous catalysis of sustainable fuels and feedstocks, including for example the development of catalysts for the direct reduction of protons, CO2 or N2 and the oxidation of water or other substrates. They perceive this active and growing area of research as motivated by key technological/environmental objectives including solar to fuels, energy storage in chemical bonds and CO2 utilisation. The appointments are intended to strengthen a growing activity in the field across Imperial College, and align with several inter-departmental institutes including the Energy Futures Lab, Grantham Institute and Institute for Molecular Science and Engineering.

View the Full Job Adverts    Closing date for applications is 15 December

The advert targets lecturer / senior lecturer positions, but more senior appointments will also be considered.  Applicants with chemical engineering expertise are also encouraged to apply, and will be considered in consultation with the Department of Chemical Engineering at Imperial.

New Branding

To mark the third phase of CO2Chem’s work and development, the network is set to undergo a re-branding – adopting an attractive new logo and accompanying colour scheme.

Now that Rob Pilling is settling into his new role as Network Manager, one of his first tasks is to translate the designs as part of a planned refurbishment of our website. He is aiming to complete the exercise as soon as possible. In the meantime, you may start to see glimpses of the materials on-line or in print – including this sneak preview of the logo itself.

CO2Chem Network Manager

CO2Chem has a new Network Manager. Rob Pilling was appointed to the post in September and is working two days per week out of the CDUK office at The University of Sheffield.

Rob has a varied background including experience of similar roles and of work spanning organic chemistry, industrial research, fuels technology, environmental policy, transport strategy, emissions management and renewable energy. Rob takes over from Katy Armstrong, who remains deeply involved with the network, both in its core projects and also now as a member of the management board.

 

 

 

Good news from CO2Chem

The first bit of good news is that CO2Chem has been refunded by EPSRC for a further 2 years, until 31 August 2019. We will be appointing a new Network Manager but be rest assured Katy will still play an active role in the network.  A job spec will be issued soon for a post at Grade 7.1 with a 0.4 FTE workload (2 days).  More details of the CO2Chem 3.0 objectives and deliverables will be published shortly.
Secondly, we have been commissioned by de Gruyer publishers to write a CO2 Textbook with a CO2Chem theme. Mike North and Peter Styring will be co-editing the book. Therefore, we are looking for individual chapter contributors. Anyone interested should send their expression of interest to the CO2Chem email address (network@co2chem.com). This should include the list of potential authors, title of the chapter and a brief summary of contents. We will then begin to build the book around those responses.

 

Carbon8 Systems secures Queen’s Award

Carbon8 Systems, the Kent-based world leader in the permanent capture of carbon dioxide using industrial waste and contaminated soils, has received the Queen’s Award for Enterprise: Innovation 2017.

The company, formed in 2006 and a spin-out from the University of Greenwich, has successfully put its patented Accelerated Carbonisation Technology (ACT) into commercial operation to create the world’s first truly carbon-negative aggregate.

The award will help Carbon8 Systems achieve its vision of creating a global portfolio of waste treatment plants that make a significant contribution to preserving the environment through the permanent capture of waste carbon dioxide (CO2).

Carbon8 Systems’ ACT technology combines CO2 gas with industrial wastes, such as cement dusts, steel slags, oil shale ash, incinerator ash or paper ash, and contaminated soils to form new products. They can then be used as carbon negative construction materials by the building industry, thus protecting natural resources, removing the waste from landfill and promoting sustainable construction. ACT was developed by Professor Colin Hills, Technical Director of Carbon8 Systems and Dr Paula Carey, the company’s Managing Director, in the School of Engineering and Science, at the Medway campus of the University of Greenwich.

Announcing receipt of the award, Dr Paula Carey, said: “The Queen’s Awards are recognised around the world and provide customers with confidence of a company’s commercial and technological edge. “Having successfully commercialised ACT for one specific waste stream in the UK, we are now working with some of the largest businesses in the world, including HeidelbergCement, Shell, Lafarge, Saint Gobain and ArcelorMittal, to commercialise ACT throughout Europe, North America and Asia”.

Carbon8 Systems has been at the forefront of promoting carbonation as one of the most effective carbon dioxide utilisation (CCU) technologies to help manage carbon dioxide emissions; with contributions to the UN GEO6 report, the Global Carbon Initiative (GCI) report, and several reports to the UK government. The company is also a founding member of the European Association for Carbon Dioxide Transformation (ASCOT).

In 2010, Carbon8 Systems licensed the technology to Carbon8 Aggregates, who then built the world’s first commercially operational ACT plant at Brandon in Suffolk, supported by investment from Grundon Waste Management. A second ACT plant opened at Avonmouth, near Bristol in 2016, and a third plant, in Leeds, has recently been granted planning permission.

Professor Hills added: “This is a huge vote of confidence in the technology which mineralises carbon, gives wastes value, and is a unique example of innovative UK low-carbon technology. “Being acknowledged globally for our innovation will now spur us on to translate this into successful international trade deals, and support sustainable construction around the world.”

The Carbon8 Systems team will receive its award from the Lord Lieutenant of Kent and attend a royal reception at Buckingham Palace hosted by Her Majesty the Queen later in the year.

For more information see www.c8s.co.uk.

Re-using carbon dioxide could provide a boost to the Scottish Economy says new study

A new report published by the University of Sheffield outlines how the re-use of carbon dioxide (CO2) could help Scotland shift to a more sustainable and circular economy.

The report titled ‘Actions required to develop a roadmap towards a Carbon Dioxide Utilisation Strategy for Scotland (2016)’, was commissioned by Scottish Enterprise to provide an overview of whether the re-use of CO2 could hold potential for Scotland and to recommend a number of actions to develop the sector.

The CO2 emissions from Scotland are predominantly from the use of fossil fuels from industrial sectors such as Oil and Gas, Paper and Wood and energy from waste. In previous years these large emitters produced 10 million tonnes per year, of which 4.3 million tonnes were identified in the report as having potential for capture.

Interest also lies with significant levels of biogenic CO2 which is released as a by-product of the fermentation of malted barley in the Scotch Whisky sector – estimated to be in the region of 500,000 tonnes each year.

The study suggests that the Grangemouth region is the location most suited to create a CO2 utilisation hub on a large industrial scale. It is the largest manufacturing region in Scotland and host to ten of the largest CO2 emitters.

However, the report makes clear that the development of the CO2 re-use sector should not be seen as a substitute for the development of a Carbon Capture and Storage sector.

The principal author of the study Dr Grant Wilson from the Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering at the University of Sheffield commented;

“For most countries and policy makers around the world, carbon dioxide is viewed only as a problem that needs to be controlled. However, with the ongoing development of novel technologies and processes for the re-use of CO2 it is also starting to be viewed as a potential resource that could be exploited.”

“This report identifies that Scotland has a unique combination of key advantages and a real opportunity to explore and develop its carbon dioxide resources. It is also important to note that it is one of the first countries in the world to even consider the creation of a roadmap for the re-use of its carbon dioxide, in essence to view CO2 as a resource.”

“This provides a very powerful message in terms of Scotland’s belief in considering all available options to decouple its future economic activity from emissions.”

The report presented a case study with a potential to be scaled up to a £500m market, sustaining 600 new jobs and a new Scottish export by utilising innovative UK technology to convert the estimated 500,000 tonnes of distillery sector (biogenic CO2) into inorganic fertiliser.

The development of this technology could be of interest to Scotland as a way to help decarbonise part of the agricultural sector through the introduction of inorganic fertiliser that is not derived from fossil fuels. The Scottish Government recently published their latest Climate Change Plan and Energy Strategy for consultation, which mentions carbon dioxide re-use and carbon capture and storage as areas of potential development.
Although the University of Sheffield report found that Scotland holds a number of key advantages to develop a carbon dioxide re-use sector, there are several areas of uncertainty that would benefit from more detailed analysis.